Please help...my OP1 wont switch on!!!!!!!!!!

I have had it for less than a year now. It was in its udg case for about 2 weeks and when I switched it on it was dead ,plugged it in and no green light,tried wall socket and my laptops usb port…its been plugged in for an hour now and still nothing…anyone had this before…I am freaking out a bit.

Sometimes a long charge over 8 hours can fix this, worth a try.

When the battery is completely drained, the OP-1 doesn’t do anything at first. Let it charge for a couple of hours, it should come back to life.

Sometimes a long charge over 8 hours can fix this, worth a try.


When the battery is completely drained, the OP-1 doesn’t do anything at first. Let it charge for a couple of hours, it should come back to life.

Thanks guys…charging now…sooo annoying my only day off to make music and its quite stressing for such an expensive piece of gear…hopefully it works again


Good luck - hopefully it will come back2life, I think it happens because of a bug in the battery monitor.

Something that has worked for me in the past is using a higher voltage outlet adapter to “juice” it, then once its on, switch to the standard adapter you usually use.

@oldlarry You mean a power adaptor that can deliver a higher current, like 2A? That would be save. But never ever input more than 5V, otherwise you might blow up the charge control circuit and/or the battery.

Gents I changed the usb cord as mentioned to me on the fb site and after 24 hrs charge it was still dead…as soon as i plugged in a differant cord the battery showed full power and switched on…sweet lord!!!

What a stressfull couple of days…never letting the battery run out again!!!

Every now and again I have to go thru the factory test sequence before it powers back up after a long sleep.

@motone honestly current or voltage, you should never plug a device into adapter its not rated for I was just super desperate and it solved my problem. I usually charge my op1 with a 5V iphone charger, but when this issue occurs I briefly juice it with my 12V ipad charger.

@oldlarry USB chargers only output 5V. iPad chargers just put out higher current. The OP-1 will only use as much as it can though - just because a USB charger says 3A doesn’t mean something will automatically use 3A.

@oldlarry My original iPad charger also outputs 5V.

thanks guys!


Just wanted to let you know what worked for me.



@motone honestly current or voltage, you should never plug a device into adapter its not rated for I was just super desperate and it solved my problem. I usually charge my op1 with a 5V iphone charger, but when this issue occurs I briefly juice it with my 12V ipad charger.

maybe you refer to Watts and not Volts?

https://www.apple.com/power-adapters/

@motone honestly current or voltage, you should never plug a device into adapter its not rated for I was just super desperate and it solved my problem. I usually charge my op1 with a 5V iphone charger, but when this issue occurs I briefly juice it with my 12V ipad charger.

@oldlarry - @motone is spot on - your advice (both posts) is misguided and potentially damaging and you really need to understand the topic before offering advice.


The voltage at the USB (device) side of the charger is approximately 5 volts. Always. Regardless of device. It doesn’t vary. If you give 12 volts to your device you will fry it.

What differs between chargers is the capability to do more work and supply more current. And what differs between devices being charged is the amount of current they will draw from the charger (depending upon the size of the battery and the rate at which it can be charged).

An iPad has a bigger battery than an iPhone and will benefit from the greater current that an iPad charger can provide. It will charge more slowly on an iPhone charger which has a lower current rating (and therefore lower wattage, since the voltage is the same). However, plugging a higher rated charger (lets say 2 amp) won’t mean that it will be shooting 2 amps at the device. The device will draw at a rate (current) that it is capable of.

But the voltage is always 5 volts. I don’t know where you’re getting 12 volts from. Perhaps your iPad charger plugs into your car cigarette lighter, but thats the supply side voltage, not the USB (device) side voltage.

CB

@cloudburst


Did you check the link I posted?

The voltage for the iPhone charger is 5V, for most iPads 5.1V and for iPad with retina display 5.2V

I understand these will not fry the OP-1 but it might bring back to life a unit that is not turning on. Does it make sense?
@cloudburst

Did you check the link I posted?

The voltage for the iPhone charger is 5V, for most iPads 5.1V and for iPad with retina display 5.2V

I understand these will not fry the OP-1 but it might bring back to life a unit that is not turning on. Does it make sense?

Howdy - yep “approximately 5V” as I mentioned. I was reacting to a previous poster who was suggesting 12V and I’ve just noticed you had pretty much the same reaction :slight_smile:


CB

oops I meant watts sry.

@motone honestly current or voltage, you should never plug a device into adapter its not rated for I was just super desperate and it solved my problem. I usually charge my op1 with a 5V iphone charger, but when this issue occurs I briefly juice it with my 12V ipad charger.

@oldlarry - @motone is spot on - your advice (both posts) is misguided and potentially damaging and you really need to understand the topic before offering advice.


The voltage at the USB (device) side of the charger is approximately 5 volts. Always. Regardless of device. It doesn’t vary. If you give 12 volts to your device you will fry it.

What differs between chargers is the capability to do more work and supply more current. And what differs between devices being charged is the amount of current they will draw from the charger (depending upon the size of the battery and the rate at which it can be charged).

An iPad has a bigger battery than an iPhone and will benefit from the greater current that an iPad charger can provide. It will charge more slowly on an iPhone charger which has a lower current rating (and therefore lower wattage, since the voltage is the same). However, plugging a higher rated charger (lets say 2 amp) won’t mean that it will be shooting 2 amps at the device. The device will draw at a rate (current) that it is capable of.

But the voltage is always 5 volts. I don’t know where you’re getting 12 volts from. Perhaps your iPad charger plugs into your car cigarette lighter, but thats the supply side voltage, not the USB (device) side voltage.

CB

Thanks cloudburst.

As an electrician, I will second everything Cloudburst said.

It’s fine to use something rated for more Watts/Amps (probably just has heavier gauge wire), a load (i.e. your device/battery) isn’t ever going to pull more current than it needs.

But do match up your voltages. 5 vs. 5.2V is no big deal, but 12V would definitely release the magic smoke or at least blow a fuse if your device is lucky enough to have one.